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The Australian capital and federal parliament was graced with a visit from a bunch of what we used to call chemists. Their unruly behaviour under the auspices of the Opposition caught many observers off guard. Filthy pharmacists flout parliament with their rude and aggressive carry on. Their sense of entitlement has obviously been groomed and well fed over the last decade of LNP governments. Small businesses making money at the expense of their customers with health problems is something close to the heart of Peter Dutton and his hardline right wing mates. They encouraged the OTT behaviour by these subsidised drug dealers in the halls of parliament.

Money Matters by Robert Sudha Hamilton

Pharmacists Behaving Badly In Parliament

My dear old dad always used to tell me, “never get between a hungry dog and his feed.” Images of this kind of thing barked upstairs whilst watching the pharmacists and their organised activism in the name of personal aggrandisement. If these feisty fellas are not careful the federal government might just let the Coles and Woolies duopoly have their long desired way with pharmaceutical prescriptions in-supermarket. Then, they would really have something to bemoan. Imagine the convenience of being able to pick up your meds in bulk at a one stop shop.

“A rowdy group of pharmacists has disrupted question time and allegedly verbally abused parliamentary staff, prompting an investigation by the Speaker into who signed them into the building.

The Community and Pharmacy Support group (Caps) protested against the Albanese government’s 60-day medicine dispensing changes at Parliament House on Monday, calling on the health minister, Mark Butler, to resign.

But the group’s behaviour during question time was condemned by Labor and independent MPs.”

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Cranky Chemists Kick Up in The Gallery

Pharmacists, on the whole, do a wonderful job for their customers, but are well paid for it too. Medicines, vitamins, and all the associated stuff available at chemists are not cheap and customers fork out plenty of money for these health enhancing items. These businesses are substantial small businesses and much money is invested in them. They have been a powerful lobby group over the decades and have had the ear of successive governments. Now, however the time has come to deliver savings to needy customers via this 60-day medicine dispensing change.

“The change was first recommended in August 2018, when the Pharmaceutical Benefits Advisory Committee considered the clinical safety and suitability of selected medicines for chronic conditions being made available under increased dispensed quantities rules.

The panel recommended patients should be able to increase their script refill from one month to two months. Up to 12 months’ supply would be available in total before a new prescription is required.

Rules in New Zealand allow patients to access 90 days of medication for chronic conditions, and rules for prescriptions in Canada and France are more flexible for consumers.”

Robert Sudha Hamilton is the author of Money Matters: Navigating Credit, Debt, and Financial Freedom.

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